‘Captain America’ deals with real-world issues

Captain America (Chris Evans) and Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) stumble on a conspiracy that could cost them their lives in “Captain America: The Winter Soldier.” (AP Photo/Marvel-Disney)

Captain America (Chris Evans) and Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) stumble on a conspiracy that could cost them their lives in “Captain America: The Winter Soldier.” (AP Photo/Marvel-Disney)

By M. Scott Morris

Daily Journal

Questions about freedom and security make up the heart of “Captain America: The Winter Soldier.”

Marvel’s world is filled with threats, and some would argue that drastic actions are needed to keep people safe. If that means everyone’s computer records and cell phone calls are government property, so be it.

Captain America (Chris Evans) works for S.H.I.E.L.D., an agency responsible for protecting the innocent, but he’s not sure about S.H.I.E.L.D.’s methods.

His doubts and questions of conscience eventually turn him into a hunted man.

His allies are Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson), whose morals are far slipperier than Captain America’s, and Sam Wilson, a retired soldier who’s willing to suit up for the right cause.

Captain America has no shortage of enemies, and some of them are people he once would’ve trusted with his life.

The action is tense and well choreographed. The movie is filled with colorful explosions, as well as fight scenes that actually push the story forward by revealing new information about the characters.

Obviously, writers Ed Brubaker, Stephen McFeely and Christopher Markus pulled from recent headlines about government spying when penning this story, but “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” doesn’t seem like a movie with an ax to grind.

Maybe that’s because Chris Evans does such a good job of bringing Steve Rogers/Captain America to life.

For those unfamiliar with his origin, he was a World War II hero who was frozen for more than half a century, so he brings an old-school sensibility to our new world.

It’s sort of like the old story of putting a frog in boiling water. It’ll just jump out, but put the frog in cold water and slowly increase the temperature and the frog will happily boil.

“Captain America: The Winter Soldier” was built to entertain, and it certainly does that with help from Robert Redford and Samuel L. Jackson as powerful men who aren’t afraid to cut corners in order to serve the greater good.

Questions about freedom and security are worth asking in Marvel’s world, as well as our own.

I give “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” an A.

It’s showing at Malcos in Tupelo, Oxford, Corinth and Columbus, as well as Hollywood Premier Cinemas in Starkville and Movie Reel 4 in New Albany.

Look for movie reviews in Scene on Thursdays, and listen each Tuesday morning on Wizard 106.7 between 8:30 and 8:45 a.m.