HED:Author describes Internet as a moment created by God

AUTHOR: ARMIST

HED:Author describes Internet as a moment created by God

By John Armistead

Daily Journal

“The Internet Church” (Word, $21.99) offers theological reasons why churches should embrace Internet technology.

There are watershed events that shape human history such as the Fall, the Flood, the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus Christ, and Pentecost, according to author Walter Wilson.

“Today we live during one of those life-altering historic events that is being orchestrated by God,” Wilson writes. “This is the Internet moment in human history. From now on, nothing will be the same.”

Wilson likens the current era to the period of time between the writing of the Old and New Testaments. During those 400 years, Alexander the Great’s army made Greek a world language, and later the Romans built a network of paved roads for their military. The first Christian missionaries traveled these same roads preaching the gospel in Greek.

“Two thousand years later, the business language of the world is English and the Internet, originally built by the U.S. military, is in place,” observes Wilson. “Is this a coincidence that this first-century theme repeats itself?”

No, according to Wilson. Rather, “God is doing something big, and we had best be clearheaded about what is going on around us. The church is in the information business, and we should not be surprised that God has raised up information technology to communicate His Word to the entire world. Christians again must travel the network, only this time it is electronic. This time it is the information superhighway.”

In the book’s 12 chapters, Wilson explains how the Internet began and its social significance, how Internet communication is changing society, and how, especially for evangelism, local churches can use the Internet. (The book’s subtitle is “The local church can’t be just local any more.”)

Wilson tells how he helped his own church, Calvary Church in Los Gatos, Calif., design a web site that draws 1,000 visitors a day from over 30 countries.

“The world may not come to Calvary Church, but Calvary Church is going to the world through the Internet,” writes Wilson. “Your church can too.”