Kids show off their Lego creations

Adam Robison | Buy at photos.djournal.com Weston Poole, 6, left, and Vikram Yeddula, 6, both of Tupelo, talk about Vikram's Lego creation, which is based on a port on the Indian Ocean.

Adam Robison | Buy at photos.djournal.com
Weston Poole, 6, left, and Vikram Yeddula, 6, both of Tupelo, talk about Vikram’s Lego creation, which is based on a port on the Indian Ocean.

By M. Scott Morris

Daily Journal

TUPELO – Directions? Who needs directions?

About 30 kids put their original Lego art on display at the Lee County Library on Monday.

The Lego Fair was the brainchild of Shruti Gupta of Tupelo, who wanted to challenge her kids to get creative with their blocks.

“I do a Lego club at home. We meet once a month and some of my friends bring their kids over,” Gupta said.

Adam Robison | Buy at photos.djournal.com Achintya Prasad, 15, of Tupelo, researched and built an Iowa class battleship, left, and a Ford class aircraft carrier.

Adam Robison | Buy at photos.djournal.com
Achintya Prasad, 15, of Tupelo, researched and built an Iowa class battleship, left, and a Ford class aircraft carrier.

Club meetings run about an hour, and Gupta wanted to see what the kids could produce given more time to plan and build their projects.

She enlisted her friends to help, then spread word about the Lego Fair on Facebook.

The event was practically made for Achintya Prasad, a 15-year-old from Tupelo. He built intricate scale models of a battleship, an aircraft carrier and a destroyer.

He researched the Navy vessels and scaled them down to size, then used about all the gray Legos he could find.

“I had to order special ones for the deck tiles,” he said. “I got 500 tiles and they were barely enough.”

Achintya’s mother, Sunita Prasad, said he doesn’t watch much television and steers clear of video games. Legos are Achintya’s favorite pastime, and he passed the affinity to his 9-year-old brother, Archi.

“Both of my kids, about the only thing they like for Christmas, other holidays or birthdays in Legos,” she said. “It’s the only hobby they have, and I’m thankful they’re imaginative and creative.”

Daniel Plunkett, a 12-year-old from Saltillo, came up with his own version of a four-by-four truck that’s climbing over a jumble of rocks.

The vehicle “isn’t supposed to look like anything, especially,” he said. “I based it on a bunch of different ones.”

Daniel finished his Lego sculpture about a month ago, but he’s been adding to it since then. His sister, 15-year-old Regan Plunkett, also made little changes over time to the house she dreamed up.

“I knew I wanted to do a fireplace,” she said. “As I built it, I had to tweak it to make it work.”

Before the exhibit began, Regan checked out pieces by the other young builders and said they were “all really cool.”

Gargi Koul, 11, of Tupelo, earned rave reviews from parents and kids for her Lego lamp, complete with a functioning light bulb and a string to turn it on and off.

“I was exploring with the pieces and sort of made the shape of a lamp,” Gargi said, “so I decided to do it.”

Kabir Gupta, a 7-year-old Tupelo resident, was inspired by the classic game, Clue. He used Lego pieces to create a three-dimensional board, including the study, ballroom and conservatory, as well as a variety of ways to kill a fictional character.

“You can actually play the game on this board. It is possible,” Kabir said. “I am going to do that this evening.”

scott.morris@journalinc.com