MOVIE REVIEW: ‘We’re the Millers’ mines raunchiness, sweetness for laughs

A make-believe family bonds while smuggling drugs across the border in “We’re the Millers.” From left are Jennifer Aniston, Will Poulter, Emma Roberts and Jason Sudeikis. (AP)

A make-believe family bonds while smuggling drugs across the border
in “We’re the Millers.” From left are Jennifer Aniston, Will Poulter, Emma Roberts and Jason Sudeikis. (AP)

By M. Scott Morris
Daily Journal

I’m not sure everyone knew what to expect when they went into the theater to see the latest Jennifer Aniston movie.

“We’re the Millers” is far raunchier than Aniston’s TV show, “Friends,” ever dreamed of being.

I’m not complaining. This summer comedy about a team of drug smugglers had me laughing from start to finish.

It stars Jason Sudeikis as David, a drug dealer who runs into serious trouble and needs to get a load of drugs from Mexico into the U.S.

The problem is he looks like a drug dealer, so he hatches a plan to camouflage himself as a family man. All he needs is a family.

That’s where Aniston comes in. She’s a stripper named Rose who gets some bad news at work, so she could really use some money.

Kenny (Will Poulter) is a kid in David’s apartment complex who’s effectively forgotten by his parents.

Throw in Casey (Emma Roberts), a tough-as-nails homeless girl, and David has built himself a family, albeit one where everyone’s familiar with the F-word and their middle fingers.

The road trip in a rented recreational vehicle filled with pot is fraught with dangers, including an angry drug lord who wants his marijuana back.

Friendships are made, too. The “Millers” meet the Fitzgeralds, who enjoy hitting the road in their RV.

But things become a little strained when the Millers learn Don (Nick Offerman) is a DEA agent.

Four people are credited as writers for “We’re the Millers,” and it’s clear from the outtakes at the end that there was a good bit of improvisation taking place.

It makes for an uneven movie, but a funny one.

In addition, a sweetness develops when the fake family begins to see itself as a real family, and that’s a counterbalance to the raunchy humor.

It’s easy to pull for David, Rose and their make-believe family, though I probably wouldn’t want them at the house for dinner.

I give “We’re the Millers” a B plus.

It’s showing at Malcos in Tupelo, Oxford, Corinth and Columbus, as well as Hollywood Premier Cinemas in Starkville.

Look for movie reviews in Scene on Thursdays, and listen each Tuesday morning on Wizard 106.7 between 8:30 and 8:45 a.m.

“Roadkill” Bill Wizard 106.7. He gives “We’re the Millers” a B.

‘It was dirty but fun. I had a good time with this movie.’