Michelle Clark, how old is she anyway?

By JB Clark/NEMS Daily Journal

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: JB CLARK is the law enforcement reporter
for the Daily Journal. He is a
23-year-old graduate of the University
of Mississippi who likes to write
about lighter things and play guitar
from time to time.


On July 13, 1988, in the Torrance Memorial Hospital near Los Angeles, I met the most amazing woman I’ll ever meet, Michelle Clark, and since that day, I haven’t gone a day without hearing her tell me she loves me.
She’s raised three boys and has done her best to mother all of our friends, too.
Two weeks ago, outside an Oxford bar, she scolded a friend for the cigarette he was smoking. She did it right in front of the attractive young woman he had just struck up a conversation with.
She isn’t afraid to embarrass us, and I think that is why we have no shame. But that is also why we are an affectionate family. We weren’t allowed to get out of the car in front of school, even high school, each morning without giving her a hug and kiss.
When I was a child, after a doctor’s appointment she would take me to lunch and let me stay home from school the rest of the day. She would call it our lunch date and I would go run errands with her afterward.
When I was older and could drive, I would oftentimes convince her to let me stay home from school or write me a school excuse as long as we went on a lunch date.
This is the part where I would mention her age by saying something like, “In her (however many) years on this earth …,” but my two younger brothers and I aren’t exactly sure how old our mom is because she was turning 39 each year for half a decade even though she doesn’t look a day over 30.
My mom’s absolute favorite thing is when her family is in one place, she always says, “I’ve got all my little ducks in a row,” even though her ducks are a lot bigger now. She especially loves when we can all sit down to dinner or to watch a movie or when we all sit next to her at First Baptist Church in Madison, and sing hymns together.
I sometimes feel like other women in my life are intimidated by how much she means to me and how much she loves me, and I guess I wouldn’t have it any other way.
We have always been encouraged to do our own thing and to do it well, and Mom has always made it clear she is proud of us, even when she is disappointed. But we try not to disappoint her too much, because we love our mom.
jb.clark@journalinc.com