New Year’s goals should be realistic, start slowly

Thomas Wells | Buy at photos.djournal.com Roy Couvion, far right, gets his regular workout in at North Mississippi Medical Center Wellness Center in Tupelo on Thursday. He'll have a lot of company in the coming days as people get to work on their New Year's resolutions.

Thomas Wells | Buy at photos.djournal.com
Roy Couvion, far right, gets his regular workout in at North Mississippi Medical Center Wellness Center in Tupelo on Thursday. He’ll have a lot of company in the coming days as people get to work on their New Year’s resolutions.

By Michaela Gibson Morris

Daily Journal

With the holidays in the rearview mirror, it’s time to get back to working out.

Nalini Akinyemi wasted no time putting her New Year’s resolution into action. The 20-year-old Tupelo woman put some sweat equity at North Mississippi Medical Center’s Wellness Center on Thursday.

“I’m young, and I want to be fit,” said Akinyemi, who was making the most of her first day as a wellness center member. “I’m tired of carrying the weight.”

Akinyemi will have plenty of company over the next several days, as exercisers who took the holidays off are joined by new members.

“Monday will probably be the busiest,” said Regina Beyer, wellness center fitness instructor.

She’ll be counseling folks to start slowly and set realistic goals so they can keep going long into the new year.

“You need to let your schedule adjust, let your body adjust” Beyer said.

On Thursday, teacher Christy Todd was taking advantage of the school holidays to enjoy exercising in the middle of the day.

“Usually I’m so tired after school I have to force myself,” said Todd, who taught in Tupelo’s public schools for 32 years before retiring and now teaches at Tupelo Christian Preparatory School.

Her resolution is to stay on her exercise schedule, getting to the wellness center three times a week.

“It makes me feel better,” Todd said, as well as relieving stress and maintaining her weight.

Thursday was just another workout for Roy Couvion of Starkville, who put in time on the elliptical and track during his lunch break.

“I’m usually up here every day,” during the workweek, Couvion said.

A truck driver, Couvion is motivated to put in the time to reduce his risk of deep vein thrombosis – where clots can form in the legs. The best advice he ever got about exercising came from a martial arts instructor.

“The day you don’t feel like coming in is the most important day to go,” Couvion said.

michaela.morris@journalinc.com