Sci-fi ‘Lucy’ starts great, then fizzles

Professor Norman (Morgan Freeman) believes people would be capable of great powers if they used their brains more efficiently. Lucy (Scarlett Johansson) brings his theories to life in the science fiction thriller “Lucy.” (AP Photo/Universal Pictures, Jessica Forde)

Professor Norman (Morgan Freeman) believes people would be capable of great powers if they used their brains more efficiently. Lucy (Scarlett Johansson) brings his theories to life in the science fiction thriller “Lucy.” (AP Photo/Universal Pictures, Jessica Forde)

By M. Scott Morris

Daily Journal

“Lucy” was a stealth movie for me when it came to its marketing campaign.

But after seeing only one trailer a couple of weeks ago, I was ready to watch this science fiction thriller. My level of happiness bumped up when my radio counterparts agreed to see it.

It stars Scarlett Johansson as the title character, a party girl who finds herself in trouble as soon as the movie starts.

She’s coerced into delivering a package that turns out to be a new drug meant to get people high all across Europe.

But a large amount of the substance gets into her system, and it changes Lucy in amazing ways. She gets smarter to a ridiculous degree, and gains control over television and cell phone signals, among other powers.

Morgan Freeman plays Professor Norman, and we get to enjoy that rich Freeman voice as he describes his research into the human brain. I doubt anyone would’ve fallen asleep at school if Freeman was giving the lecture.

It seems that Lucy is living out Norman’s theories, so she searches him out.

At the same time, a gangster and his crew are searching for Lucy so they can get their blue substance back and dish out some revenge.

Up to this point, I’m in the tank for “Lucy” and its festival of violence. Then the final 30 minutes of the movie happens and everything turns to mush.

Don’t worry: There will be no spoilers.

It should be noted that writer and director Luc Besson is a master storyteller, so even as I was annoyed during the climax, I still cared how “Lucy” ended. He delivers suspense in an original way, so cheers to him.

The problem is a stupid, little plot point that becomes a stupid, giant plot point. What’s worse is it could’ve been avoided with a few changes to the script.

So I left the theater with a significant dip in my happiness level.

I give “Lucy” a C.

It’s showing at Malcos in Tupelo, Oxford, Corinth and Columbus, as well as Hollywood Premier Cinemas in Starkville.

M. Scott Morris is a Daily Journal feature writer. Contact him at (662) 678-1589 or scott.morris@journalinc.com.