What’s hot in 2014? Neutrals, pops of color, mixing old and new

Lauren Wood | Buy at photos.djournal.com A neutral couch at Staggs Interiors comes alive with a series of orange pillows. The velvet pillows with linen fringe offer a soft contemporary touch to a traditional couch.

Lauren Wood | Buy at photos.djournal.com
A neutral couch at Staggs Interiors comes alive with a series of orange pillows. The velvet pillows with linen fringe offer a soft contemporary touch to a traditional couch.

By Ginna Parsons

Daily Journal

TUPELO – If you’re looking for one, specific trend in interior design for 2014, you’re probably not going to find it.

“I don’t think it’s any one thing anymore,” said Stephen Thompson of Designer Connection in Tupelo. “The culture is too fractured, split into multiple facets. But if you’re a consumer, that’s great because you can find something that fits your personality.”

With that said, Thompson did offer up a few observations about what you’ll likely be seeing this year in homes across Northeast Mississippi.

Lauren Wood | Buy at photos.djournal.com A trio of emerald green vases adds a contemporary feel to a room.

Lauren Wood | Buy at photos.djournal.com
A trio of emerald green vases adds a contemporary feel to a room.

First, is color, specifically Pantone’s Color of the Year – Radiant Orchid.

“This is a bridge color you’ll see to tie things together,” he said. “I figured it was going to be something in the purple family this year because that color’s been out for a while, but customers have been asking for it.”

Something else he’s seeing in our area is the use of chalk paint and wax on furniture.

“People see this on HGTV and they say, ‘I can do that,’” he said. “They’re putting it on good pieces and some that aren’t. It’s an easy way to get a new look. Plus, you’re taking things that would have been going to the junk yard or the trash bin and bringing them back to life with color.”

Karen McCarty, a licensed designer and director of interiors for The McCarty Company in Tupelo, said she expects to see more neutral backdrops in homes this year.

“In 2013 we saw a little bit of that with white, but now I’m seeing more neutral, organic backdrops,” she said. “And I’m not seeing much wallpaper, but when I do, it’s textured, like grasscloth.”

McCarty also said she’s noticed folks rolling up their Oriental rugs and replacing them with fun and contemporary rugs with a splash of color.

“Kind of like a Bohemian look, but not too much,” she said. “Just a flash of accent.”

Lauren Wood | Buy at photos.djournal.com Geometric-patterned bound rugs are now taking the place of wall-to-wall carpeting.

Lauren Wood | Buy at photos.djournal.com
Geometric-patterned bound rugs are now taking the place of wall-to-wall carpeting.

Connie Morgan, an interior designer for Staggs Interiors in Tupelo, said she saw bold, bright accent colors when she was recently at market.

“We definitely saw more color,” she said. “Gray is still big as are neutrals, using texture, sisal rugs and geometric rugs. We’re seeing a lot of emerald green, blues, navies, citron, oranges and reds.”

What people are doing is taking a neutral color and adding a pop of color to it.

For instance, you might have a bedroom with soft gray walls and linens and a cherry red throw at the foot of the bed. Or a traditional cream-colored couch in a living area with bright orange accent pillows.

“When you go hog wild with one color, that dates a room really quickly,” she said. “Pink is popular right now, but you have to think about your situation. Most men aren’t going to like too much of that.”

Morgan and McCarty both said mixing old and new is very trendy right now.

“You want to mix transitional pieces – blending soft contemporary with traditional pieces,” Morgan said.

“Everything has to have layers and texture to it,” McCarty said. “You’ll see pottery and fine china mixed together. It’s not just one thing. It’s an expression of someone’s home.”

Thompson said a final trend he’s seeing is that people are doing something he calls aging in place.

“Older people are redoing their homes so they can stay in their neighborhoods and not have to go to an assisted living or nursing home,” he said. “They’re redoing bathrooms with no-lip showers and moving master bedrooms downstairs. They’re taking care of their own sanctuary – and that’s important.”