HOMEGROWN: Fulton Veterinary Clinic

Dr. James Doug Thrash, right, has been helping heal Itawamba County’s animals through his practice at the Fulton Veterinary Clinic since 1974. Thrash was recently joined by his daughter, Dr. Jami Thrash, who he said occasionally sees things a bit different than he does. The mix, he said, is a good one. (Adam Armour)

Dr. James Doug Thrash, right, has been helping heal Itawamba County’s animals through his practice at the Fulton Veterinary Clinic since 1974. Thrash was recently joined by his daughter, Dr. Jami Thrash, who he said occasionally sees things a bit different than he does. The mix, he said, is a good one. (Adam Armour)

It wasn’t until 1979 that Dr. James D. Thrash – “Doug” to just about everybody – opened his veterinary practice. But Thrash had been helping heal animals long before he opened the doors of Fulton Veterinary Clinic.

“I’ve worked on animals. … tried to fix stuff on them … since I was little,” he said.

The clinic provides small- and large-animal medicine, surgery, dentistry and boarding.

Growing up, Thrash was amazed by what veterinarians could do, how they could examine a sick animal, solve the mystery of what was ailing them and make them feel better. In turn, that made their owners feel better, too.

More than three decades after opening his own clinic on Hardens Chapel Road in Fulton, Thrash’s business is an Itawamba County staple. He still enjoys his work – on most days, at least.

“There have been days that I’ve enjoyed it less than others,” he admitted with a slight grin. “But I believe I am still making a difference in the lives of the animals that I treat and those of their owners.”

Just like any longtime doctor will confess, medicine has changed drastically over the years. The same applies to the treatment of animals. Keeping up with the constant stream of medical advancements can be tricky. In a rural community, access to some of the newer, more expensive equipment isn’t feasible, either. Instead, Thrash mostly relies on his knowledge, instinct and pet owners’ feedback to diagnose what’s wrong with an animal.

His daughter, Dr. Jami Thrash, joined his clinic in May, and her knowledge and ideas complement his nicely, Thrash said.

“It’s nice,” he said of working side-by-side with his daughter. Oftentimes, they have different ways of looking at things. “The mix of old and new is a good one,” he said. “Our approaches can be somewhat different, but our goals are the same.”

Adam Armour, Itawamba County Times

ESTABLISHED: 1979

OWNER: Dr. James D. Thrash

EMPLOYEES: Five

ADDRESS: 104 N. Hardens Chapel Road, Fulton

PHONE: (662) 862-2943

HOURS: Monday-Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.