Camp explores connection of science, sports

Adam Robison | Buy at photos.djournal.com Tupelo's Hampton Adair, 9 of Tupelo, aims his bow during a lesson at the "Science in Motion" camp as part of the Tupelo School District's Camp Opportunity held at Lawndale Elementary School on Tuesday.

Adam Robison | Buy at photos.djournal.com
Tupelo’s Hampton Adair, 9 of Tupelo, aims his bow during a lesson at the “Science in Motion” camp as part of the Tupelo School District’s Camp Opportunity held at Lawndale Elementary School on Tuesday.

Adam Robison | Buy at photos.djournal.com Trey Humphries, from Archery in Mississippi Schools, teaches Tupelo's Ben Chapman, 10, the proper way to hold and use a bow-and-arrow.

Adam Robison | Buy at photos.djournal.com
Trey Humphries, from Archery in Mississippi Schools, teaches Tupelo’s Ben Chapman, 10, the proper way to hold and use a bow-and-arrow.

By Chris Kieffer

Daily Journal

TUPELO – Some Tupelo students are learning this week about the connection between sports and science.

Those attending the school district’s week-long “Science and Motion” camp have learned how a curve ball moves and the forces at play in golf. They had an archery lesson on Tuesday and later this week will launch a rocket and discuss soccer, among other activities.

Under the umbrella of the school district’s month-long Camp Opportunity at Lawndale Elementary School, the session is led by Lawndale P.E. teacher Bo Boatner and THS physics teacher Jonathan Begnaud.

“The best thing about it is these kids are doing science already, they just hadn’t thought about it that way,” Begnaud said. “In all of these activities, they see the science involved so we’re trying to get them to think about things they are doing already.”

Tuesday’s archery lesson was led by East Union archery coach Trey Humphreys, who also is the area director for the organization Archery In Mississippi Schools. In addition to shooting compound bows at targets, the students discussed velocity, direction, potential energy and kinetic energy.

“Science is applied to everything we do, PE included,” Boatner said.

Hampton Adair, 8, a rising third-grader at Lawndale, and Natalie Bowers, 11, who will enter sixth-grade at Milam, enjoyed learning how to shoot the bow.

“It is really fun to aim it and to know you can aim well,” Natalie said.

Natalie also said it was cool to learn how to throw a curve ball.

“You twist your hand so it starts going as you throw it,” she said.

chris.kieffer@journalinc.com