Country's values are under attack, Eupora's Ross says

By Patsy R. Brumfield/NEMS Daily Journal

TUPELO – Republican congressional candidate Henry Ross of Eupora is spreading his message across the district – that the three pillars of faith, family and freedom are under attack and he’s ready to fight to save them.
Ross told the Daily Journal editorial board Monday that America started its downhill slide with the separation of church and state by the U.S. Supreme Court, which he insists, was not what the nation’s founders had in mind at all.
“We are a Christian nation,” he said. “There’s no wall of separation, nothing in the Constitution to say there is” other than a prohibition on a tax-funded national church.
He also said he fears that if President Barack Obama gets to replace one of the court’s four conservative justices, freedoms like gun rights will disappear.
He blames the destruction of the American family in large measure on the failure of President Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society welfare programs, which denied assistance to mothers in households where there was a wage-earning male present.
And he blames the U.S. Congress for standing by and watching the disintegration.
“They haven’t – Republicans and Democrats – done anything to stop it,” he said.
Ross, a 53-year-old attorney, former Eupora mayor and former Navy JAG officer, wagged a finger at what he calls “career politicians” for putting their own personal careers ahead of America’s best interests.
“An undisciplined Congress has been sitting there and spending all this money,” he said. “Career politicians have stood by and run up this debt for Big Government to keep themselves in office.”
Ross is on the June 1 GOP primary ballot with Angela McGlowan of Oxford, a former Fox News commentator, and Alan Nunnelee of Tupelo, a businessman and state senator.
The winner will meet incumbent Rep. Travis Childers, a Democrat from Booneville, and seven other independent or non-mainstream party candidates on the Nov. 2 general election ballot.
Asked if his statements about “career politicians” were aimed at Nunnelee, he said the voters would have to decide if they considered the senator one.
Ross supports a federal spending freeze, partial privatization of Social Security, cuts in federal income and corporate taxes, increased domestic energy development, 12-year term limits for members of Congress and impeachment of Supreme Court justices who don’t abide by the Constitution.
Ross also said congressional earmarks – spending directed by members of Congress to projects in their states or districts – have been abused and, if retained, should be limited equally among House and Senate members for worthy district programs. “But we’re doing everything with borrowed money,” he says.
“And, if our country fails, it won’t matter how much we brought home.”
Ross said he’s not comfortable with much about the new U.S. health care law, and he’d vote to repeal it, if he’s sent to Congress.
The law will boost health care costs and the national debt and erode freedom, he said.
“A lot of health care today is done as a defense mechanism against medical malpractice,” Ross said. “We need tort reform. Democrats don’t want it because they’re beholden to the trial lawyers for campaign contributions.”
He said any health care reform that followed repeal of the new law would need nationwide competition, portability and rewards for healthy lifestyles.
Contact Patsy R. Brumfield at (662) 678-1596 or patsy.brumfield@djournal.com.