If fining males for attire, then do same for women Last week we learned from the local news that Saltillo aldermen have passed a new law prohibiting the wearing of baggy pants which show underwear or fall somewhere below the waist

By NEMS Daily Journal

If fining males for attire, then do same for women
Last week we learned from the local news that Saltillo aldermen have passed a new law prohibiting the wearing of baggy pants which show underwear or fall somewhere below the waist.
I see some eager beaver, bored attorney jumping all over this. Those who wear baggy pants seek desperate attention, usually young men without a lot to offer other than mere bravado, are displaying their idea of sexual prowess. The person dressed like this is making a clumsy childish effort to show that the rules of proper dress do not apply. I’m not sure that the law is gender specific but photos showing the drooping pants were male.
Women have been showing body parts for centuries in a bid for attention. Skirts with brevity bordering on obscene. Some showing underwear, others just barley covering their assets. Necklines today show cleavage plunging to an unknown – in many cases very well known – abyss. I’m not suggesting we take clothing back to that of the early English settlers, but wouldn’t it be nice to see those with less than perfect derrieres and exposed mammary glands fined for showing off these attributes. Unless, of course, they are feeding their young.
If men are going to be censored on what they wear then it’s only right that women be too.
Brenda Burcham
Burnsville

Memorial Day brought a flood of memories
The observance of our most solemn holiday, Memorial Day, brought back a host of war time memories.
Image at age 17 being in Casablanca, North Africa. I was sent overseas before I celebrated (with a cupcake and one candle) my 18th birthday. My ship made 20 crossings of the Atlantic Ocean. We went to London, Edinburgh, Scotland, Cardiff, Wales, Londonderry, Ireland, Cherburg, France, the Caribbean and Havana, Cuba.
Imagine being transferred to Boston from a World War I destroyer, having Ramp&R in a hotel that the Navy took over. Then we were transferred to a destroyer escort until the end of World War II. Next, ordered to the Pacific from Bayonne, N.J. Then we stopped at many of the different islands of the Pacific Ocean to the mostly calm of the Pacific with its hot, hot water and equally dangerous typhoons.
As we traveled from Samoa to Manila in the Philippines and doing air sea rescue, weather patrol and submarine lookout, we went to where we were ordered by our commanding officers and Admiral Halsey.
After the bomb drops in Japan on the two cities and surrender, we were ordered to Tokyo Bay to witness the surrender aboard the battleship Missouri. I even saw Gen. MacArthur in Tokyo at the headquarters hotel.
Then back to Pearl Harbor and on to Los Angeles. We took a train from Long Beach to New York City via Chicago. Then it was on to Long beach Naval Station, N.Y., for discharge.
After getting my discharge, it was back to New Jersey and return to high school for my diploma.
We did our duty and would return to the Navy for our country’s honor. We now have the honor and privilege to live in the most freedom-loving and God-fearing country in the world.
I salute the Navy and all services, especially since I had a brother in each branch of service, a son in the Navy, a son in the Army and a daughter in the Marines, plus her husband a fellow Marine.
So always honor our fallen men and women both in the past, present and future. Keep God in your hearts and prayers to protect our freedom.
May God bless our veterans and may God America.
Tom Lucas
Pontotoc

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