Oxford Superintendent Stasny dies at 55

OXFORD – Oxford School District Superintendent Kim Stasny died Wednesday after an unsuccessful surgery to remove a tumor in her brain.
Stasny, 55, had been superintendent since 2009 after spending 19 years with the Bay-Waveland School District in Hancock County.
Stasny had announced in April she was taking medical leave because of the tumor. Assistant Superintendent Brian Harvey took over her role.
“The Oxford School District has lost a wonderful educator, administrator and friend,” Harvey said. “Dr. Stasny’s compassion and optimism will be missed. She always saw the best in all people and in every situation.”
He specifically cited her work on the city’s recent successful bond referendum and plans for a new high school.
Lafayette County Superintendent Mike Foster said he admired Stasny as a colleague and a friend.
“She was a leader, and she had a vision of where she wanted the district to go,” Foster said. “It’s going to be a loss to the community.”
Stasny was the first woman to lead the Oxford School District when she began her tenure in July 2009. During her two years with the district, Oxford High School earned the top Star School rating from the Mississippi Department of Education.
Stasny joined the Bay St. Louis-Waveland district in 1990 as a principal, after spending years in as a principal in the Hancock County School District.
She became the superintendent of the Bay St. Louis-Waveland District in 1999. She served in that position for 10 years and led the district through Hurricane Katrina. Stasny was also named Mississippi’s Superintendent of the Year in 2007.
“I knew what an outstanding job she had done in Bay St. Louis,” said Lee County Superintendent Mike Scott. “I know she was an outstanding educator. We are deeply sorry as a district and our sympathy goes out to her family and the Oxford School District.”
Said Tupelo Interim Superintendent David Meadows: “ She had a very strong sense of direction and was a personable instructional leader. Her passing will be a loss to the educational community.”

NEMS Daily Journal