Protesters plan TEA party in Tupelo

TUPELO – Grant Sowell is having a tea party in front of City Hall on Wednesday, but Sowell and friends won’t be sipping any of the brewed beverage.
The gathering is part of a nationwide TEA (Taxed Enough Already) party protesting what supporters say is out-of-control government spending.
Business owner Grant Sowell is the lead organizer of the event in Tupelo, where he hopes hundreds will attend.
“We thought it would be appropriate to have the event on April 15, the day taxes are due,” he said.
A “join the TEA party” campaign has enlisted supporters from across the country, and as of Friday, gatherings at nearly 2,000 cities had been planned.
“We think we can have the largest gathering in North Mississippi,” Sowell said. “There’s one in Jackson, but a lot of people can’t make that trip, so we wanted to have one here instead.”
While conservatives are the main supporters of the event, Sowell said the issue goes beyond political boundaries.
“We don’t see this as a Republican thing or a Democrat problem. We see this as a chance for citizens concerned about how their money is being spent,” he said. “It’s not about Christians and non-Christians. It’s simply about our children’s and grandchildren’s future.”
Sowell said participants are encouraged to bring their children to the event.
On the national group’s Web site at www.teapartyday.com, organizers list several beefs they have with Congress and President Barack Obama, including recent massive spending and tax bills voted on “without even reading it,” trillions in borrowing “leaving a debt our great-grandchildren will be paying,” refusing to stop the flow of illegal immigration, and moving toward “government-controlled health care.”
Sowell said Congress and President Obama should hear from citizens about how they want their money spent.
“I want to honor the office of the president, and I have great respect for the office,” Sowell said. “But there are things that I have the right to disagree about.
“I know I’m only one person and one voice, but together, we can send a message.”

Contact Dennis Seid at (662) 678-1578 or dennis.seid@djournal.com.

 

Dennis Seid/Daily Journal