Remember: Spring forward one hour

Dave LeMote uses an allen wrench to adjust hands on a stainless steel tower clock at Electric Time Company, Inc. in Medfield, Mass. on Friday. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

Dave LeMote uses an allen wrench to adjust hands on a stainless steel tower clock at Electric Time Company, Inc. in Medfield, Mass. on Friday. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

By Joe Rutherford

Daily Journal

Daylight Saving Time starts at 2 a.m. Sunday, so everyone should set their clocks and watches forward one hour before going to bed tonight.

DST remains until Nov. 2, when most people who live in the U.S. will need to “fall back” one hour to Standard Time.

Arizona, except for the Navajo Indian Reservation, is the only state in the continental U.S. that doesn’t observe Daylight Saving Time.

The general reasons cited for DST are energy savings through less use of electricity with more evening daylight and the recreational advantages it provides.

Benjamin Franklin understood the concept of saving daylight, noting when he was ambassador to France that the longer daylight of the European summer often meant that he missed hours of sunlight because of his sleeping habits. However, he did not propose a way to implement the idea.

Germany was the first nation to use Daylight Saving Time, adopting it during World War I to save energy consumption for artificial lighting. The U.S. soon followed, and during World War II, the nation was on DST for the whole war; it was called “war time.”

Daylight Saving Time was extended by four weeks in 2007 when its start was moved from the first Sunday in April to the second Sunday in March and its end from the last Sunday in October to the first Sunday in November.

joe.rutherford@journalinc.com