Roger SCV closes out successful Civil War, militaria show

Adam Robison | Buy at photos.djournal.com The Col. W.P. Rogers Camp of Sons of Confederate Veterans concluded its fifth annual Civil War and Militaria Show at the Crossroads Arena Conference Center in Corinth on Sunday.

Adam Robison | Buy at photos.djournal.com
The Col. W.P. Rogers Camp of Sons of Confederate Veterans concluded its fifth annual Civil War and Militaria Show at the Crossroads Arena Conference Center in Corinth on Sunday.

By Lena Mitchell

Daily Journal Corinth Bureau

CORINTH – On the second day of Corinth’s Fifth Annual Civil War and Militaria Show, Sunday business was brisk, bringing some shoppers and visitors back for another look.

“We’ve had good attendance this weekend,” said Larry Mangus, commander of the Col. W.P. Rogers Camp of Sons of Confederate Veterans, which sponsors the event. “Sales have been really outstanding, and all the vendors say they’re coming back next year.”

Unless the event moves into a larger space to expand, however, there may not be room.

“We have about 40 vendors with 65 tables,” said Buddy Ellis, SCV member and event coordinator. Ellis said he and Mangus each gave up one of their two tables to accommodate other vendors. “We have vendors from as far away as Indiana and North Carolina, and I’ve talked to visitors from Texas, California, Missouri, Alabama and Tennessee.”

Vendors offered knives, bullets, money, belt buckles, guns, canteens, uniforms, flags, caps, swords and even metal detectors to help with the search for hidden treasures.

Mark Badgett of Mount Airy, N.C., has brought his sword collection to Corinth for four years.

“I’m retired and collecting has been my hobby for 28 years,” Badgett said. “I prefer to collect religious artifacts, but my specialty is Confederate Steel. I enjoy small shows and have a good time in Corinth.”

Collectors usually like to display their finds in nice cases, and woodcrafter Eddie Harrison brought a large selection from Savannah, Tenn., for that purpose.

“This is my first Civil War show,” Harrison said. “I usually set up at arts and crafts fairs, and come to Corinth’s Green Market also. This has been a good weekend for me.”

Harrison, of Horse Creek Woodcrafting, said he makes his display boxes from barn wood, leaving some with a natural rough texture and planing some pieces for smoothness and to show the wood grain. Buyers say they use them to hold everything from arrowhead to knife to thimble collections.

The annual show and sale is a major fundraiser for the SCV camp, Mangus said, supporting various preservation projects.

Fundraising is underway now to install a historic marker in Rienzi to recognize the only Confederate soldier listed on the Roll of Honor five times. The group’s ongoing support goes to help with renovation of the Verandah-Curlee House Museum.

“We’re not trying to be the biggest show in Mississippi,” Ellis said, “but we have a lot of quality stuff and we’re trying to be the best show in Mississippi.”

lena.mitchell@journalinc.com