The American Cancer Society Making Strides Events

Making Strides
• The American Cancer Society Making Strides events raise funds and awareness to fight breast cancer and provides hope to people facing the disease. With each step, you’ll help the American Cancer Society save lives. To learn more about how you can help create a world with less breast cancer and more birthdays, visit cancer.org/stridesonline or call 1-800-227-2345.
* Since 1993, nearly 6 million walkers have raised more than $400 million through the American Cancer Society Making Strides events. In 2009 alone, nearly 700,000 walkers across the country collected more than $60 million to help create a world with less breast cancer and more birthdays.
* One of the ways the American Cancer Society is saving lives is by finding cures through groundbreaking research. The Society invests more in breast cancer research than in any other cancer type. Society-funded research has led to the discovery of lifesaving breast cancer treatments, including Tamoxifen and Herceptin.
* Attention, ladies! The best defense against breast cancer is finding it early. If you are 40 or older, get a mammogram and a breast exam by a doctor or nurse every year, and always report any breast changes to your doctor without delay. Sign up for a free e-mail mammogram reminder at cancer.org/MammogramReminder and encourage the women you love to do the same.
* Use your voice to help ensure all women regardless of income have access to mammograms and lifesaving breast cancer treatments. Visit acscan.org/makingstrides to learn how you can fight back to help more women celebrate more birthdays.
* Help reduce your chances of developing breast cancer by exercising regularly, maintaining a healthy weight, and limiting the amount of alcohol you drink.
* Want to fight back against breast cancer? Volunteer to help people facing breast cancer get well through American Cancer Society breast cancer support programs. If you are a breast cancer survivor, consider becoming a volunteer. Get trained to provide one-on-one support to newly diagnosed patients. Go to cancer.org/breastcancer to learn how you can help save lives.
* If you know a woman who is 40 or older and is not getting her yearly mammograms because she is afraid of the test, encourage her to visit cancer.org/mammovideo to watch a video of women talking about their experiences with mammograms.
* Sometimes you need to talk with someone who has “been there.” The American Cancer Society matches trained volunteers who are breast cancer survivors with women who are newly diagnosed breast cancer patients to help them get well and learn to cope with their disease while providing emotional support and information. To learn more and find out how to get involved, visit cancer.org.
* Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women (excluding skin cancer). Learn how to stay well by taking steps to reduce your risk for cancer or detect it at its earliest, most treatable stage, at cancer.org/breastcancer.
Prevention and early detection
* To stay well and reduce your cancer risk, strive for at least 30 minutes of exercise in addition to your usual activities on 5 or more days each week.
* To stay well and reduce your cancer risk, maintain a healthy body weight by eating a well-balanced diet that includes plenty of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Limit the amount of red meats you eat, especially high-fat and processed meats. Learn how delicious a healthy diet can be at eatrightgetactive.org.
* Get help quitting smoking for yourself or a loved one, or join the fight against tobacco as an advocate for smoke-free communities at cancer.org/GreatAmericans. In November, join the American Cancer Society for the Great American Smokeout.
* Want to learn ways to have more energy, feel better, and lower your stress level – all while helping to reduce your risk of cancer? Find activities to fit your lifestyle and get ideas for raising active kids at eatrightgetactive.org.
* You can take charge of your health! Evidence suggests that one-third of all cancer deaths could be prevented with proper diet and exercise. Learn more at eatrightgetactive.org.

LESLIE CRISS / NEMS Daily Journal