Three Civil War markers added to Heritage Trail

Adam Robison | Buy at photos.djournal.com Tupelo Convention & Visitors Bureau Executive Director Neal McCoy, left, and Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center park ranger Tom Parson unveil the Plank Road marker, which is identified on the side facing East Main Street.

Adam Robison | Buy at photos.djournal.com
Tupelo Convention & Visitors Bureau Executive Director Neal McCoy, left, and Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center park ranger Tom Parson unveil the Plank Road marker, which is identified on the side facing East Main Street.

By Dennis Seid

Daily Journal

TUPELO – Adding to the Heritage Trails Enrichment Program, the Tupelo Convention & Visitors Bureau unveiled three more Civil War markers on Friday.

The program, which identifies, marks, interprets and promotes people, places and events in Tupelo and Lee County, was launched this year to feature three main areas: the Chickasaw Nation, civil rights and African-American heritage and the Civil War.

On Friday, the Plank Road marker was unveiled first at Gateway Park on East Main Street.

During the Civil War, in the winter of 1864, Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood found the going rough on the muddy road surrounded by a swamp.

“Thousands of trees were cut down, with their flat side up and placed side by side to form a road, and that’s why it was called Plank Road,” said Tom Parson, a park ranger at the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center who attended Friday’s event.

The next marker was the Iron Furnace maker on Front Street, across from the Mitchell McNutt law office.

The Iron Furnace was named for the facility housing Union prisoners, a poorly vented warehouse building.

The Younger Cabin marker was the final one revealed Friday, in front of the Goodlett Manor on Broadway Street. The home’s proximity to the railroad and the Pontotoc-to-Fulton Road – which is now Main Street – was an ideal place for high-ranking officers to stay during the Civil War.

Tupelo CVB Executive Director Neal McCoy said at least five more markers will be placed on the Heritage Trail by the end of the fiscal year next September.

“By placing these markers, we’re giving more opportunities for visitors to come to Tupelo,” he said.

So far this year, two markers have been unveiled on the civil rights and African-American heritage trail and one has been placed on the Chickasaw Nation trail.

dennis.seid@journalinc.com