Tupelo man thankful for a second chance at life

Adam Robison | Buy at photos.djournal.com Brandi Peters, an occupational therapy assistant, works with Jamiron Eatmon at the Longtown Medical Park. He shattered his elbow and femur in a motorcycle accident in June.

Adam Robison | Buy at photos.djournal.com
Brandi Peters, an occupational therapy assistant, works with Jamiron Eatmon at the Longtown Medical Park. He shattered his elbow and femur in a motorcycle accident in June.

By JB Clark

Daily Journal

TUPELO – A year ago Jamiron Eatmon was teaching 2-year-old son Jakari to walk, but now his son is teaching him.

Eatmon, 23, of Tupelo, doesn’t mind because he is happy for a second chance at life and a renewed perspective.

Eatmon had just graduated from Itawamba Community College and enrolled in the pre-med program at the University of Mississippi this summer, when a June 11 crash left him with a shattered arm and broken femur.

He was driving his motorcycle home when a truck pulled out in front of him on Green Tee Road and his motorcycle collided with the truck. He said he doesn’t remember anything else about the crash.

A broken femur from the crash kept him in a wheelchair until October, and it took 11 surgeries to repair his arm and leg. Now Eatmon can walk without help and is working, with the help of an external flexator, to restore motion to his elbow.

“I’m thankful for a second chance at life,” he said. “I’m more obligated to my responsibilities and I just feel better, stronger and more confident and positive about things.”

For now, Peters is anxious to finish his rehab, have the external flexator removed and resume his pursuit of a medical degree. To keep motivated, he said he spends time with Jakari and writes music. Also keeping him motivated is the rehabilitation staff at Longtown Medical Park.

“For him to have gone through all he has gone through, he is positive,” said Brandi Peters, an occupational therapy assistant who works with Eatmon. “He comes in here with a smile on his face. He’s very outgoing. I wouldn’t have the attitude he has.”

Peters said she saw him first in a wheelchair and then walking with a cane and now he walks freely into her office.

“He’s come a long way and it’s all because of his positive attitude,” she said.

jb.clark@journalinc.com