UPDATE: Bodies of Tennessee mom, daughter found in Mississippi

By Staff and wire reports












UPDATE 9:05 p.m.

The Associated Press
GUNTOWN — The bodies of a Tennessee mother and her oldest daughter were found behind an alleged kidnapper’s house in north Mississippi, the FBI said Monday, and authorities believe the woman’s two other daughters are still with the man accused in their abduction.

Jo Ann Bain and her three daughters disappeared April 27 as the family was packing to move to Arizona. The bodies of Bain and her 14-year-old daughter, Adrienne Bain, were found behind Adam Mayes’ house near Guntown, a rural area police have been searching. Union County authorities have confirmed the bodies were found in the Alpine community.

The bodies were discovered late last week and positively identified. The FBI did not say how the two died.

The FBI said it believed Bain’s two other daughters — 12-year-old Alexandria and 8-year-old Kyliyah — were still with Mayes. The agency did not say in a news release why it thought that. Mayes may be using two different aliases Christopher Zachery Wylde or Paco Rodrigass, the FBI said.

FBI spokesman Joel Siskovic said no further details were available on the bodies or the search for Mayes and the two girls.

Full press release from FBI

Memphis, TN. – Federal, state and local law enforcement personnel from Tennessee, Mississippi and elsewhere are continuing their efforts to locate Adam Mayes and the victims of the kidnapping that occurred in Hardeman County, Tennessee, on April 27, 2012.

The Shelby County Medical Examiner has positively identified the bodies recovered from behind the Mayes residence, as those of Jo Ann Bain and 14 year old Adrienne Bain.

Alexandria Bain (12) and Kyliyah Bain (8) are believed to still be with Adam Mayes. Adam Mayes may be using the alias of Christopher Zachery Wylde or Paco Rodrigass.

Anyone with information that may lead to the location of Adam Mayes and/or the missing victims should immediately contact the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation at 1-800-TBI-FIND (1-800-824-3463).

The FBI and USMS are offering a reward of up to $50,000.00 for information that leads to the apprehension of Adam Mayes and the location of the missing victims.

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State troopers stopped vehicles at roadblocks Monday and officers searched the yard of a home in northern Mississippi, seeking to unravel the mysterious disappearance of a Tennessee mother and her three daughters and find the family friend accused of abducting them. Updates below from Daily Journal reporters and our press services …

UPDATE 7 p.m. -

By Errol Castens
NEMS Daily Journal

Union County Coroner Mark Golding said he has not received any information that he can release.
“They don’t want to give (Mayes) any information,” Golding said. “The bodies were being autopsied in Memphis, as investigators believe they died in Tennessee rather than in Mississippi.”
The bodies that have been found have not been identified.
Union County Sheriff Jimmy Edwards aimed to reassure area residents.
“We want the public to know that there is certainly need to be aware and cautious, but we don’t want anybody to be overly afraid,” he said. “They’re very well protected (by) the FBI, U.S. Marshal Service, Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, Mississippi Bureau of Investigation, Mississippi Highway Patrol, Mississippi Bureau of Narcotics, all surrounding county sheriffs.”
Edwards said a $50,000 reward is in place for information leading to Mayes’ arrest and conviction. Anyone with such information may call any law enforcement agency, he said.

Read more from Errol Castens in Tuesday’s NEMS Daily Journal newspaper.

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UPDATE: 4:20 p.m. -
By Emily Le Coz
NEMS Daily Journal

The suspect in the case of a missing woman and her daughters had lived with his parents in the Alpine community only part of the time and in Tennessee the rest, said his landlord Mary Patterson.

For the past two years, Patterson said she has rented the double-wide trailer at 1343 Highway 9 North to Adam Mayes and his family. He lived there with his parents, Johnny and Mary Mayes, as well as a woman Patterson described as Mayes’ wife, Teresa Mayes.

All had moved from Tennessee, Patterson said, but she didn’t know from which city. White Pages showed a recent address for all four Mayes in Jackson, Tenn., the same place from which Jo Ann Bain, 31, and her daughters – Adrienne, 14; Alexandria, 12 and Kyliyah, 8 – went missing.

Since the Mayes family moved in, Patterson said, they have maintained the property and often stopped by for neighborly visits. She said she can see their house from her front door.

“They were just friendly – friendly to everybody. Never met a stranger, that type,” said Patterson, who spoke to the Daily Journal by phone Monday.

Adam Mayes worked odd jobs, she said, and often left for weeks at a time to go back to Tennessee. Facebook pages for the suspect and the victims all link to each other, as well as to that of Teresa Mayes, and show various photos of them all together.

Patterson was shocked to learn two bodies were discovered Friday in the backyard of Mayes’ parents. She said it doesn’t make sense.

“Oh, it scared the fire out of me,” Patterson said. “It worried me to death. The whole neighborhood is shook up about it.”

Local, state and federal agencies now are searching for Adam Mayes in connection with the Bain family disappearance. In the meantime, the FBI has yet to release the identifies of the bodies found in the backyard.

The rest of the Mayes family has since moved into a motel, Patterson said.

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UPDATE 2:30 p.m.:
By ADRIAN SAINZ,Associated Press

GUNTOWN — State troopers stopped vehicles at roadblocks Monday and officers searched the yard of a home in northern Mississippi, seeking to unravel the mysterious disappearance of a Tennessee mother and her three daughters and find the family friend accused of abducting them.

Mississippi state troopers who were stopping vehicles and searching their trunks along State Route 30 near Guntown said they were conducting a manhunt for 35-year-old Adam Mayes. He’s being sought in the April 27 disappearance of Jo Ann Bain and her daughters: 14-year-old Adrienne, 12-year-old Alexandria and 8-year-old Kyliyah.

Officers also searched the yard of a home near Guntown that’s been linked to Mayes.

Authorities are investigating whether the disappearance of the mother and daughters is related to two bodies found late last week in the Alpine Community in Union County at the house police have connected to Mayes. The effort to identify the bodies continued Monday.

Mayes was last seen a week ago in Guntown, about 80 miles south of the Bain family’s home in Whitesville, Tenn.

Kidnapping warrants have been issued for Mayes. The Mississippi Department of Public Safety said Saturday it believed “the children may be in extreme danger.”

Jo Ann Bain and her daughters were last seen at their home outside Whiteville. Before they disappeared, the Bains had been preparing to move to Arizona.

The mother’s Facebook page shows that in the days before the four disappeared she was packing and working on homework. Her last post, dated April 26, said “a good venting always makes you feel better.” It didn’t say why she was venting.

A web of ties connects Mayes to the missing woman and her family. They were all known around Whiteville, a town of about 4,500 people 60 miles east of Memphis. Mayes was a longtime friend of Bain’s husband and had been at their home the evening before they disappeared, police said.

Both Gary Bain and Mayes were once married to sisters, Tennessee Bureau of Investigation spokeswoman Kristin Helm said.

Mayes had stayed over at the Bains’ house to help the family pack and load up a U-Haul to drive across the country to Arizona, Helm said. Gary Bain, who was at the house that night, awoke to find his wife, daughters and Mayes gone.

He couldn’t reach his wife on her cell phone that day, and reported them missing when the girls didn’t get off the school bus.

While authorities say Mayes is likely to be armed and extremely dangerous, acquaintances describe him as friendly, helpful and like an uncle to the girls.

Gerald Long, 60, of Jackson, Tenn., said he last saw Mayes about two years ago. He said Mayes lived across the street from him for about a year with his wife, Teresa. He described Mayes as a “sociable person.”

He was helpful, Long said. “He didn’t seem violent or anything.”

As for his relationship with his wife, Long said “they were always up and down about things.” Long would not elaborate.

The neighbor said he thought Mayes and his wife are no longer together.

Jo Ann Bain’s aunt said she was waiting Monday for authorities to tell her that her niece and the girls are safe.

“I pray for Jo Ann and the girls to be OK and for them to come home,” said Beverly Goodman, who works at Whiteville City Hall.

She said that her niece was not the type of woman to run off with someone.

Goodman expressed frustration that the authorities didn’t issue an amber alert sooner. “What would it have hurt to put an Amber Alert out?” Goodman said. “They might have saved a couple of lives.”

“Jo Ann and the kids, everyone loves them. We’re just hoping to hear that they’re safe,” said Linda Kirkland, a family friend and cook at the Country Cafe in Whiteville, Tenn.

Kirkland said the woman and her daughters were moving to Arizona because two of the girls had asthma.

FBI spokesman Joel Siskovic said authorities talked to Mayes early on in the investigation, but he fled when they tried to contact him again.

Authorities had said over the weekend that Mayes could be in Mississippi but that he has ties to Arizona, Texas, North Carolina, South Carolina and Florida.

Authorities said Adrienne has brown hair and eyes. She’s 5 feet 4 inches tall and 129 pounds. Alexandria has brown hair and hazel eyes and is 5 feet tall and 105 pounds. Kyliyah has blond hair and brown eyes and is 4 feet tall and 57 pounds.

Mayes has brown hair and blue eyes and is 6 feet 3 inches tall and weighs 175 pounds.

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UPDATE: 1:39 p.m. – FBI agent taking buckets and shovels behind Mayes house. The address of the home is 1373 on Highway 9.

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UPDATE: 1 p.m. – Law enforcement is now at a home owned by Mayes parents in Union County. At least 10 law enforcement vehicles on the scene. More as it is available.

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UPDATE 12:44 p.m.: Daily Journal reporter Errol Castens and photographer Thomas Wells report several law enforcement officials were at a home before going inside for about an hour and then leaving quickly in Alpine Community of Union County at County Road 226. It wasn’t clear what happened at the scene and no law enforcement would comment.

Another group of law enforcement have gathered at Guntown.

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Alleged kidnapper of Tenn. mom, 3 girls was friend

The Associated Press
WHITEVILLE, Tenn. — A man accused of abducting a mother and her three daughters was a family friend described as being like an uncle to the girls.

Now Adam Mayes, 35, is the subject of an Amber Alert and faces charges in the disappearance of Jo Ann Bain and her daughters 14-year-old Adrienne, 12-year-old Alexandria and 8-year-old Kyliyah.

The case is shrouded in uncertainty as investigators have yet to reveal many details. Authorities found two bodies late last week at a house in Mississippi linked to Mayes. Bain and her daughters were first reported missing from their Tennessee home a week earlier. Mayes is missing and has ties to several states.

FBI spokesman Joel Siskovic told The Associated Press on Monday that authorities were waiting on a report from the state’s medical examiner’s office before identifying the two bodies in Mississippi. He would not say if the bodies were those of children.

Authorities have described Mayes as being armed and extremely dangerous.

Jo Ann Bain’s husband Gary and Mayes knew each other, Tennessee authorities said.

Mayes “thought the world of those little girls,” observed Melvin Herron, 42, who lives next door to the Bain family in western Tennessee and recalled seeing the girls playing outside, running and going down water slides.

On Sunday, forensic scientists with the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation searched the garage and backyard at the Hardeman County, Tenn., home where Bain, her husband and the three girls live.

Gary Bain declined to comment Sunday to an Associated Press reporter.

“Jo Ann and the kids, everyone loves them. We’re just hoping to hear that they’re safe,” said Linda Kirkland, a family friend and cook at the Country Cafe in Whiteville, Tenn.

Kirkland said Sunday that the woman and her daughters were moving to Arizona because two of the girls had asthma. Other than dealing with a recent death in the family, Bain, who had frequented the restaurant, never indicated anything was wrong.

“She seemed so happy,” Kirkland said.

Jo Ann Bain and her daughters were last seen in their home early April 27, according to Kristin Helm, a spokeswoman for the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation.

Mayes and Gary Bain had long been acquainted, having once been married to sisters. Helm said he was viewed as an uncle.

“Mayes is a family friend who was staying there that night to help the family pack and drive a U-Haul to Arizona the next day with Gary because the family was planning on moving there within the month,” Helm said. “Gary was asleep at the home that night and woke to find them gone in the morning and the car gone. Mayes was gone too.”

Gary Bain woke up after the kids typically went to school so he didn’t expect to see them, Helm said. But then he tried calling his wife on her cell phone during the day and couldn’t reach her.

When the girls didn’t get off the school bus, he reported them missing to the sheriff’s office that evening.

Helm said Gary Bain’s adult daughter and his granddaughter had also spent the night at the family’s home, but that the grown daughter didn’t see Jo Ann or the girls the next morning. And the car was missing.

On April 30, the vehicle was found abandoned in Hardeman County, which is about 70 miles east of Memphis. Jo Ann Bain and her daughters had left most of their personal belongings at the house, Helm said.

On Friday, the TBI reported that the girls were with Mayes in Mississippi, but there was no evidence that a crime had been committed.

Mayes was last seen Tuesday in Guntown, Miss., about 80 miles southeast of the Bains’ Tennessee home.

Siskovic said authorities talked to Mayes early on in the investigation, but that he fled when they tried to contact him again. Authorities said Mayes did not appear to have a criminal record.

Police had been trying to determine whether Jo Ann Bain went with Mayes willingly.

By Friday, Mayes had a warrant on file in Hardeman County for false report stemming from information he gave investigators about the case.

Siskovic said Saturday that the bodies were found late Friday or early Saturday in a Mississippi home. He wasn’t sure if the home belonged to Mayes or an acquaintance.

The Mississippi Highway Patrol issued an Amber Alert on Saturday morning for the girls, and Tennessee authorities have also issued an alert.

The Mississippi Department of Public Safety said Saturday it believed “the children may be in extreme danger,” and that warrants for kidnapping had been issued for Mayes.

The FBI and U.S. Marshals Service also announced a reward of up to $50,000 for information that leads to the location of the missing victims and the arrest of Mayes.

Authorities had said over the weekend that Mayes could be in Mississippi but that he has ties to Arizona, Texas, North Carolina, South Carolina and Florida.

Authorities described Adrienne as having brown hair and eyes. She’s 5 feet 4 inches tall and 129 pounds. Alexandria has brown hair and hazel eyes and is 5 feet tall and 105 pounds. Kyliyah has blonde hair and brown eyes and is 4 feet tall and 57 pounds.

Mayes has brown hair and blue eyes and is 6 feet 3 inches tall and weighs 175 pounds.

However, authorities said Mayes may have cut his hair, as well as cut and dyed the girls’ hair to disguise their identities.

Back in the Bains’ neighborhood, neighbor Herron said he hoped the bodies found in Mississippi were not the girls or their mother.

“I’m praying to God it’s not those little girls,” he said.

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Associated Press writer Holbrook Mohr in Jackson, Miss., contributed to this report.