us 72 access road

Access road progress slowed

by recent rains, flooding

Alcorn County

providing $300,000 match money for

$7.5 million grant.

By Jane Clark Summers

Daily Journal Corinth Bureau

CORINTH – Recent rains and flooding have slowed field work on an access road that will create a direct route from Kimberly-Clark’s Kendrick Road facility to U.S. 72.

Progress on the 4.5 mile access road, however, is moving forward at a good pace, said Kent Geno, project engineer with Cook Coggin.

“We are currently still proceeding with field data and gathering activities identifying a proposed centerline route and cross-sectioning,” Geno said. “We will soon be performing environmental clearance work with various governmental agencies and preparing data so that the county can begin the right of way and easements acquisition process.”

The right-of-way acquisition process is expected to start in four to six months, he said.

When completed, the two-lane road will provide a direct route to U.S. 72 for some 90 transport trucks that travel in and out of the Corinth facility each day. The roadbed will be 80 to 100 feet wide and will be built to handle the heavy truck traffic.

Plans include two overhead bridges that will cross Norfolk Southern and the Redmont railroad lines.

Geno said the route goes through the town of Farmington and connects with U.S. 72 just east of the Clear Creek Bridge, which is east of Marty’s Fish and Steak House. The two existing railroads and existing topography dictated this location, Geno said.

“We had to choose locations to cross the railroads where bridges could be constructed without requiring lots of fill material, etc., and the geometrics of the proposed new road at these locations had to be correct,” he said.

The new road will improve the safety of the driving public since trucks are now traveling routes that take them either by Alcorn Central Schools or Corinth High School.

Funding

The county is providing $300,000 in match money for a $7.5 million grant from the state Economic Development Highway Program.

The city of Corinth received a $300,000 Community Development Block Grant to make sewer and water improvements.

Kimberly-Clark is investing $73 million at the Corinth facility.

Two and a half years ago, corporate officials with Kimberly-Clark were planning to install equipment the length of a football field at their Owensboro, Ky., plant.

An economic incentive package developed by the state of Mississippi swayed the company to expand at the Corinth facility instead.

In addition to the access road, the incentives included a $10 million waiver of property taxes on equipment for the next 10 years, workforce training by Northeast Mississippi Community College and infrastructure improvements.

Kimberly Clark is investing $45 million in equipment that produces industrial wiper products – a billion dollar annual market. The expansion project saved 116 jobs at the Corinth Away-From-Home plant. That project leveraged another $28 million investment to retool a sister Non-Wovens Plant that produces plastic fibers for Huggies and related products.