KATHLEEN PARKER: Four ladies from Burma

By Kathleen Parker

When Burma’s Zin Mar Aung was placed in solitary confinement for trying to organize students in 1999, Bill Clinton was president of the United States.
When she was released, Barack Obama was in the Oval Office.
Zin Mar Aung says she had never heard of George W. Bush or his wife, Laura, who used her own bully pulpit to push for liberation of Burma’s most famous political prisoner, democratic leader Aung San Suu Kyi, then under house arrest.
Suu Kyi is well-known to many now because of the largely unacknowledged work of the Bushes, as well as Hillary Clinton and John McCain. Since her release, Suu Kyi has risen to public office, accepted her Nobel Peace Prize and been the subject of a movie (”The Lady”).
Less well-known are four rising female leaders with whom I met, including Zin Mar Aung, who are visiting the U.S. this month for leadership training. Their delegation is sponsored by Goldman Sachs’ “10,000 Women” program, in partnership with the George W. Bush Institute, the McCain Institute and the Meridian International Center.
Start here: Imagine living under a military dictatorship where free speech is punishable by incarceration, torture or worse. Imagine sitting in an 8-by-8-foot cell alone for 11 years with nothing but a small water jug, a “sink” for waste, and a 15-minute daily break for a cold bath in a communal tub. Throw in a lack of any amenities (shoes) or even necessities, such as sanitary napkins.
This was Zin Mar Aung’s life for 11 years.
Then one day, she was free.
It takes courage to put one foot in front of the other, much less to become an activist.
The accomplishments of the four also include helping political prisoners, providing education and training to underserved girls and young women vulnerable to trafficking, and advocating for victims of domestic violence.
The three other women are: Hla Hla Yee, a mother, attorney and former political prisoner who counsels marginalized women and provides paralegal training in orphanages and elsewhere; Shunn Lei Swe Yee, who mobilizes young people to work for a more civil society; and Ma Nilar OO, who worked for the International Red Cross for 18 years, advocated for political prisoners and personally provided some of those aforementioned necessities to Zin Mar Aung and Hla Hla Yee when they were imprisoned.
Some of these struggles sound familiar, even in our relatively advanced democracy.
Everything – from how to build a feminist movement to how to create a political party – has to be invented from scratch. What is the message? What is public opinion? How does a person get elected?
Imagine that. And then meditate about – or pray for – the safety and success of these four brave women.
Kathleen Parker’s email address is kathleenparker@washpost.com.