Letters to the Editor

By NEMS Daily Journal

Tupelo makes progress in Indian relations
It’s a good thing Mayor Reed and attorney Greg Pirkle, chairman of the Major Thoroughfare Program, talked with Lt. Gov. Jefferson Keel of the Chickasaw Nation, concerning possible burial sites along the purposed Northern Loop; it demonstrates just how far the city of Tupelo has come in relations with the Chickasaw Indians.
I recall a time in the not so distant past, when no thought would have been given to a Native American’s grave by a city government.. However that is not the case now. Great care is now taken to preserve all known Native American sites within our city. I personally know Lt. Gov. Keel, and he and his wife have visited me at my home, we have broken bread together, and shared our hopes and dreams for all Native Americans. I found Jefferson Keel to be an honest, honorable person, a man of his word; I also found him to be a shrewd politician, I guess he gets that from his Colbert blood.
E. Delano (Ed) Christian
Tupelo

Plan needed for locating missing elderly people
In the late fall of 2008, a nurse practitioner from Pelahatchie lost her mother for several hours. An Alzheimer’s patient, she was with her husband who left her seated in a store in Northpark Mall while he went to get the car. When he returned, she was gone.
The search that ensued involved the daughter working with the Ridgeland Police, Jackson Police, several television stations as she frantically tried to track down her mom.
What ensued was a horrible 13-hour story that ended with good news. Her mother was located at Cabot Lodge in Jackson at 2:30 a.m. During that 13-hour ordeal, the family initiated every move – furnishing her picture to local television stations, working with several police departments, calling all area hospitals, calling hotels, all of which led to story’s good ending.
The nurse practitioner, seeing a need to develop a plan for others who had elderly parents with dementia, turned to the Mississippi Nurses Association. Several geriatric nurse members of MNA came together to work on this issue. At the MNA convention in October 2009, a resolution was passed to pursue legislation to set up a Silver Alert system in Mississippi, similar to Amber Alert for children. Members rallied around this issue, helped draft legislation, convinced Rep. Steve Holland and Sen. Hillman Frazier to sponsor bills. They worked with the Department of Public Safety to craft the language, enlisted support from the Alzheimer’s Association, AARP, and nursing home associations, came to the Capitol to testify and worked diligently to pursue what they saw as a real need for those elderly patients with dementia.
Because nurses cared, this legislation has passed the House and Senate and should be headed to the governor for his signature soon.
Gayle Harrell
President

Mississippi Nurses Association

U.S. spends twice what all others do on military
Why does the U.S. spend annually on its military more than twice that of all the other countries in the world combined?
Is everyone our enemy, or is it because the corporate dude owning the factory turning out war supplies is getting richer, and richer? And also owns Congress? Remember, the High Court recently ruled that since a corporation has the same rights as a living being, it can shovel all the “Thirty Pieces of Silver” it desires, into a political campaign. How much voice does that leave a working man in this “government of, by, and for the people”?
It seems that we really only have ONE political party in Washington. The money party! With two wings, fighting each other. Nero is fiddling while Rome burns!!
Lamar Wray
Eupora

Republican strategies don’t add real numbers
Newt Gingrich spoke at CPAC about the Republicans winning big in November if they adopt the “2+2=4” strategy. How?
Nothing the Republicans have done in the past nine years adds up. When they were in complete control of our government, their actions resulted in the worst terrorist attack in our history, and 8 trillion dollars in new debt. Their “hands off” approach to governance and regulation led to collapse and taxpayer bailouts of the financial institutions and placed us on the verge of a great depression.
“Hindsight is 20/20 vision” and reasonable people should be able to argue the merits and competency of political parties and political leaders respectfully. The facts above are met with “how long are you going to keep blaming Bush?” – but I am not blaming Bush. Clearly the blame and shame is on those who voted for the Republicans and believe in their philosophy without realizing how damaging it is to the American experience.
Without merit or competency, the only sane argument made in defense of Republicans is that they are “moral”, which irrationally, is a polarized argument of “good versus evil.” Rationally, political affiliation does not make a person more or less immoral, but the Republicans have covered-up and allowed for the sake of their moral reputation, a child molester, like Mark Foley in their ranks to prey on children.
Republicans are not evil; they have questionable merit and competency where morality is concerned. As sensible voters, you know that the Republicans received money and support from gambling and war profiteering interests. WWJD, as Christ said “where your treasure is, there is your heart also.”
Newt continually seeks to redefine concepts. ”Government is bad,” but the Bush administration’s bailout of the financial institutions saved our economy and the Obama’s administration’s swift action in dealing with Swine flu appears to have prevented a global pandemic and saved millions of lives. Sorry Newt, only incompetent government is bad. Before Republican voters go around parroting the talking heads about “socialism” and who is and who ain’t a “socialist,” apply merit in hindsight to the proper definition of “socialist.” Newt believes there are not enough sensible voters, and we are easily fooled. I would like to see him proved wrong.
Robert Strickland
Red Bay, Ala.

Biblical principles play into our moral decline
I have to remember I am of an older generation. Maybe my thought processing is all mixed up. Also, I must remember that I am a retired U.S. Army, Command Sergeant Major with 36 years of service. So what do I know? Could it be I am just out of touch or maybe I can’t get out of my box? Wait a minute, could it be that we Americans have just been desensitized to the swarming anti-American rhetoric and activities here in the USA? I ask, when is treason not treason? Further, why do we, as a nation, wink at treason?
Webster defines treason in part as: “the betrayal of a trust; the offense of attempting by overt acts to overthrow the government of the state to which the offender owes allegiance or to kill or personally injure the sovereign or his family.” (Webster’s Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, 1972)
When people(s), organization(s) or a movement(s) seeks to overthrow the USA, that is treason. What in the world has happened to treason? Under the caption of: “Did you hear?” “In South Carolina, any group that plans to overthrow the federal government – or any other government in the U.S. – must register its activities.” (Page 5A, Tuesday, March 2, Journal) Instead of registering those that are engaged in sedition, why not arrest them and charge them with treason?
Why are we, as a nation, playing with our national security? Where are our elected leaders? We remember back in 2004, Senator John Kerry said, “We have to get back to the place, we were, where terrorists are not the focus of our lives but they’re a nuisance.” Webster defines the word nuisance as: a thing or a person causing trouble, annoyance, or inconvenience. Is treason, the need to overthrow our government by some traitors, just a nuisance? Is this the mindset of our elected officials in Washington, D.C? We need true grit in Washington, D.C.
C. S. Lewis (1898-1963) was right when he said, “We laugh at honor and are shocked to find traitors in our midst.” When biblical principles of righteousness are put aside and “we laugh at honor” the result will be the decay of society.
Donald R. Fox
Saltillo

Sen. Scott Brown’s vote reflects common sense
On Feb. 22, Scott Brown, the newest senator from Massachusetts fired a shot across the bow of the juggernaut of – The GOP. In one fearless and surprising stroke he brought common sense back into American politics. He voted yes on the jobs bill in the senate and with that one vote he turned the tide of gridlock into a filibuster proof majority by bringing along four other moderate Republican senators, Susan Collins, Olympia Snow, George Voinovich and Christopher Boyd. Is this the extension of an olive branch, a white flag or is it just good politics?
I hope it’s something akin to common sense. I have never agreed with Scott Brown before now and I hope this will not be the last time, but I will not hold my breath while I wait for this to happen.
Arvin Mosley
Tupelo

‘Moth-in-ear’ patient decries high med costs
I’m 56 years old and have no health insurance. If I could buy insurance, it would be higher than a house payment and I don’t have those resources.
I’m not complaining. That’s just the way it is. However, I had a recent experience at the emergency room that exemplifies just how out of control our medical costs are at this time.
Last September I walked out of my house around 9 p.m. to go to the store. A half-inch moth flew into my ear like a bullet. It fluttered and flapped, fully alive.
I tried to flush the moth out of my ear at the kitchen sink to no avail.
I went to the emergency room at the hospital and within an hour was admitted to the actual ER. An ER doctor came into the “ear room” and in all of 30 seconds, retrieved moth, still fluttering. He took the moth down the hall to scare the nurses because I could hear them shouting to “get that thing away from me.”
The doctor thought it was very funny and had a good laugh at my expense. That 30 seconds cost me $470 in just the doctor’s fee.
I was outraged at the sheer gall to charge me that kind of money.
The hospital charge was $175 for walking in the door.
Then there was another charge for $150 in fees for the “ear room.” Want to add that up?
It’s staggering how much simple care costs. When something that simple costs nearly $1,000, we’re in trouble as a country. I realize the frustration of costs gone amok. Government run healthcare is no answer. Costs will go higher. But surely the medical establishment must realize they have an obligation to do a service for a reasonable cost. If not, government is coming and it’s not going to be pretty.
Keith Merritt
Tupelo