MICHAELA MORRIS: Costume pushes family creativity

MICHAELA MORRIS

MICHAELA MORRIS

The Morris family can be a creative bunch, but our skills generally run more to words, finger painting and collages, not fabricating Halloween costumes.

While we enjoy watching the stars of “Heroes of Cosplay” make elaborate costumes for comic book conventions in frantic overnight sessions, we aren’t inclined in that direction. (Who knew what you could do with fabric, foam and paint?)

So when our 8-year-old announced he wanted to be the Grim Reaper for Halloween, a cloak and hood were added to the weekly shopping list. After the groceries were put away, he tried on his costume and began exploring the motivation for his Oct. 31 role.

He considered the goofy reaper from “Bill and Ted’s Bogus Adventure” as well as the scarier versions. He mulled being silent the entire night. I told him that wouldn’t fly. No little goblin of mine is going to get away with demanding candy with a commanding gesture. The niceties of saying “Trick or Treat” and “Thank you” must be observed.

But most of all, he was focused on a specific prop – the scythe.

After all, without the scythe, a reaper is merely a grim, scary guy in a black cloak. Even though Halloween is a week and a half away, the scythe was a high priority, and he enlisted the problem-solving abilities of the entire clan.

Mom’s suggestion of adding reflective tape to the scythe was overruled, but they offered a compromise of blinking lights on the candy bag to avoid a safety veto.

With a bit of guidance, he sketched a cardboard blade to be attached to a walking stick brought home from the trails at Tishomingo State Park.

As we watched football games on Saturday afternoon, we ran down two black Crayolas to turn brown cardboard into a metallic blade worthy of death.

After a debate over the merits of duct tape to join the blade and stick, the blade was wedged into a split in the top of the walking stick and strapped in place with a needle and black thread.

So even if it’s not the whole truth, the Morris family can now officially claim that we have sewn together a Halloween costume. Will wonders never cease?

Michaela Gibson Morris is a Daily Journal staff writer. Contact her at michaela.morris@journalinc.comor (662) 678-1599.