This letter is regarding Edwin Feulner’s Sept. 8 Opinion Page

CATEGORY: Letters

AUTHOR: JOER

This letter is regarding Edwin Feulner’s Sept. 8 Opinion Page column on “political correctness” on America’s campuses.

I agree wholeheartedly with Mr. Feulner that PC has gotten way out of hand. People are afraid to say anything anymore for fear that they might say something wrong. It seems to me that a lot of the PC groups are against the Christian faith and Mr. Feulner’s mention of a “double standard” hit the nail right on the head.

Every faith in the world has its own way of celebrating special events. To say that Christmas carols wherein Christ is mentioned cannot be sung because those types of songs might make persons of other faiths and non-religious people feel unwelcome is, to say the least, ridiculous. Lighting the Christmas tree and singing Christmas carols is what Christmas (Christ Mass) is. We Christians are celebrating the birth of our Lord, Jesus Christ. People of other faiths or non-religious persons have no need to feel “left out” nor should they be offended. The songs are not meant to make anyone feel uncomfortable.

Mr. Feulner’s example regarding Native American ceremonies tells it all. If our friends of the Native America, Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, etc., communities celebrated a special rite, I, as one, believe it would be very culturally interesting, but would never find it unsettling because a song might mention something in which I did not believe.

If the “higher-ups” want to edit the songs and rituals of the Christian faith, then all faiths should be under the same scrutiny (sounds a little communistic to me). But to do so would keep all of us brothers and sisters of the world apart and ignorant of each other. Their PC-ness does not make everyone feel welcome it only pulls us apart. People’s diversity, whether it be by faith, custom, religion, rite, race or gender, is what “we” are all about. “We” are here to love and respect one another regardless of our differences and we should embrace those differences not hide them.

Ellen Whitley

Amory

jr for 9.16

March supports

diabetes resaearch

On Saturday, Oct. 18, thousands of walkers from the Tupelo area and all across America will take a hike to benefit the American Diabetes Association. They’ll be making every step count by taking part in the Buddy Bain Memorial Walktoberfest a five-mile walk-a-thon that raises money for diabetes research.

More than 16 million Americans 121,000 in Mississippi alone have diabetes, a disease that impairs the body’s ability to process sugar from food into energy needed for daily life. Another 120,000 people with diabetes don’t even know it. Untreated, diabetes can lead to complications like blindness, kidney disease, heart disease, stroke, and leg or foot amputations. Diabetes is the fourth-leading cause of death by disease in the U.S. and there is no cure.

Our goal for Walktoberfest is to raise important contributions for the research that will help us find a cure for diabetes, and to raise public awareness about its risk factors and warning signs. But we’re not in it alone.

Kay Bain, many local corporate teams, as well as individual area residents have already signed up for this important event and we’d like to invite your readers to join us, too.

For more information on Walktoberfest, or to sign up as a walker, sponsor or volunteer, call the American Diabetes Association at 1-800-254-WALK today.

Thank you for helping make Walktoberfest a success.

Stephanie Johansen, ADA Area Director

Amber Clemons, Manager, Diabetes Treatment Center

Marsha Tapscott, North Mississippi Medical Center Marketing

Tupelo

or 9.16

head:The fairy tale

came to an end

I also mourn the death of Princess Diana, a princess who dared break the rule of a tradition by getting involved with the public, to mingle with the poor, sick, homeless, bereaved. The list goes on.

As the sleeping princess lay silent, I kept thinking her prince would give her a kiss and awaken the princess. But not this prince that caused her shame, and the prince that could have kissed the hurt lay silent, also. The princess’ heart was pricked by the evil queen as she (the princess) once quoted. The princess was stripped from her royal name.

I see the princess reach out and greet Mother Teresa at heaven’s gates of pearl. She says, welcome to a royal palace. The streets are paved with gold, where Jesus welcomes them both. He introduces them to God the King. He looks at them both as they humbly bow and says, “Well done, my good and faithful servants.” (Matthew 25:21).

Shirley Hall

Tupelo