Not your father’s Tremont

Zach Adams | Buy at photos.itawambatimes.com Senior Daniel Sturdivant has played a large role in Tremont's hottest start in recent memory. The Eagles are 10-3.

Zach Adams | Buy at photos.itawambatimes.com
Senior Daniel Sturdivant has played a large role in Tremont’s hottest start in recent memory. The Eagles are 10-3.

By Brandon Speck

Daily Journal

Tremont went 15-14 last season, its first winning season since the 90s.

Power forward Cody North, 6-foot-6 and one of two Tremont big men, enters this season trying to help the Eagles make more recent memories.

“We’ve got to get better at handling adversity and be better with the press,” North said, “being strong with the ball, not having mental lapses on offense.”

The Eagles are already thinking about division opponent – and 1A champ – Biggersville’s press, but before last season, memories of tenured-Tremont success was tough to conjure.

Former coach Brady Ramey – now principal, but still sitting on the bench with first-year head coach Brian Pearson – couldn’t pinpoint the exact year of the last winning season.

These Eagles, 10-3 to start the season, are trying to put that in the past, whatever year it was.

Success will come heavily behind the play of two big men, two really big men.

Seniors North and Daniel Sturdivant, 6-foot-7, are one of the biggest duos in 1A basketball.

“That’s our bread and butter and we know it,” Pearson said. “It’s a lot easier said than done sometimes, but that’s what we’ve got to do to be successful.”

Sturdivant is averaging a double-double – 14.6 points and 11.6 boards. North is averaging a team-high 19.5 points and 7.8 rebounds.

Sophomore guard Walker Adams is averaging nearly 10 points per game.

Tremont made it to the Thursday game of the Class 1A North state tournament last season, the longest playoff run in probably 30 years, Ramey said.

These Eagles are too young to remember that playoff run.

Changing the course of history isn’t totally about the bigs. Pearson said senior point guard Steven Peden has to be in control before the ball goes outside-in.

“It’s just little things,” Pearson said, “where you don’t have those mental mistakes, where you just let one slip out of your fingers and all that. We can’t afford to do that in order to be a good team.”

brandon.speck@journalinc.com