Building a legacy: Maddox shares decades of construction expertise

Thomas Wells | Buy at photos.djournal.com Tupelo’s David “Bubba” Maddox is leading a team of volunteers for Glyn Hester Builders to bring Sanctuary Hospice House’s Tiny House project to reality.

Thomas Wells | Buy at photos.djournal.com
Tupelo’s David “Bubba” Maddox is leading a team of volunteers for Glyn Hester Builders to bring Sanctuary Hospice House’s Tiny House project to reality.

By Michaela Gibson Morris

Daily Journal

TUPELO – Big or small, David “Bubba” Maddox loves to see a house come together.

With nearly 40 years in construction, the 60-year-old Tupelo man said it’s deeply satisfying to put the finishing touches on a house. The most important thing is that the people who will live in the home are pleased with the finished project, he said.

“That’s rewarding,” Maddox said.

Maddox is leading a team of volunteers for Glyn Hester Builders to construct a very special tiny house that will be auctioned off to benefit Sanctuary Hospice House. Maddox said he’s been amazed by the community’s generosity in donating materials, appliances and support to create the project.

“It’s a great tribute that we can do something for them,” Maddox said.

Building life

Maddox, who grew up in Tupelo, found his life’s work early. His first project was a folding race track for his toy cars when he was a kid. After graduating from Tupelo High School, he studied forestry at Itawamba Junior College, but ended up in construction.

Maddox worked for Glyn Hester for a decade before taking a position as a construction manager for Hancock Fabrics. He served in that role, managing projects at stores across the country 22 years before returning to his home building roots with Hester six years ago.

His favorite part of the work is the trim work at the end of the project, adding the modeling and final touches that turn a construction site into a home. But he also appreciates the unexpected challenges each day brings.

“We do it all,” Maddox said. “I was on a back hoe yesterday.”

When Maddox isn’t on the job site, he is often busy with family, including wife Barbara, daughters Jessica and Carrier, and grandchildren, Jackson, Kinley Grace and Elizabeth. He balances family construction projects with hunting and fishing trips.

A 56-year member of Harrisburg Baptist Church, Maddox has volunteered his expertise through the years. He has worked on projects through church groups, the Baptist Children’s Village and mission trips.

“I’ve been blessed with the ability,” Maddox said. “It’s a way to give back and use the gifts God has given me.”

Tiny house

The Sanctuary project is certainly the smallest house he’s built, but there’s nothing tiny about the effort.

“This is above and beyond a normal tiny house,” Maddox said.

The Tiny House has grown into a high-end project. Transport Trailer created a custom trailer for the house and provided the warehouse space to keep the builders out of the weather. Local businesses have donated appliances and materials. When it is complete, the Tiny House will be auctioned at a special event later this spring.

Maddox’s leadership on the project has been invaluable, said Mel Whitfield, who had the vision for the project.

“Bubba Maddox was the driving force,” Whitfield said. “He dug into the architectural house plans and made it happen.”

Work began over the summer. Because the crew members are donating their time and expertise, they worked primarily on Friday nights and Saturdays. Normally, winters are quieter when the weather makes it difficult to work outside, but that hasn’t been the case this year.

“We were busy all winter,” Maddox said.

Framing was a challenge as the builders worked around the unique windows, Maddox said. Making sure everything stays plumb and level when the house is on a trailer has been another hurdle.

Now shiplap is on the walls. One of the two sleeping lofts is framed in. Appliances are on deck waiting to be installed. It’s almost time for interior paint and cabinets.

“We’re on the short road,” Maddox said. “It won’t take much more.”

michaela.morris@journalinc.com

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